CIAŁO/UMYSŁ

Halfbreadtechnique - performance of exchange

“Halfbreadtechnique” is a funny and provoking performance which can change your plans for the evening (no more and no less than that). The performance raises the question of how much we need for our own fulfillment and personal prosperity.

7 October 2016, 20:00
45 min
Tickets

Regular 40 PLN
Discount 30 PLN

Venue
Nowy Teatr
Kup bilet

Description

Applied investigation about the relationship between do-gooders and charity. Money is becoming a prop to expose the art of sharing, driven to the absurd.

A postman with an envelope addressed to members of a technical crew appears on the stage. Martin Schick, playing a part of a performing artist from Switzerland, lets the audience seize his remuneration. Plus there is also a guest dancer from an “economically troubled country”.

“Halfbreadtechnique” is a funny and provoking performance which can change your plans for the evening (no more and no less than that). The performance raises the question of how much we need for our own fulfillment and personal prosperity. Discover the beauty of sharing: find the “more“ in what seems to be the“less“. 


Meeting with the author Martin Schick after the performance

HALFBREADTECHNIQUE  in one of Low Budget Series (2016-18)

A collection of low cost but high value performances by Martin Schick

The Swiss artist stages a series of low-budget performances declining all the standard conveniences typically provided to an artist in order to become a real partner during the encounter with his audience. The viewers become involved in the creative process and the theatre is transformed into a space where experiencing takes place. The aim is not to create another “product”with socio-political theme in the background, but to present the political character of the process of performance development encompassing all stages of production -  starting from technicians and ending up with critics.

It is an artistic answer to cost-cutting measures, financial crises, or institutions’complaints about their continuous lack of funds, but also a financial self-portrait of Schick himself who scrutinizes his own life of a spoilt, subsidized artist from a rich country.

 

 

 

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